We have always liked to tell stories with our songs

Be'Lakor

Thank you for taking the time to talk to us in these busy times! We saw on your Facebook that you have some big news to share, you got signed to Napalm Records?

Thanks! It’s our pleasure, cheers to you for the interview! Yes, signing to Napalm was a really good step for the band. They have already helped us with some great new contacts and have been very supportive.

You're about to release your fourth record, and this is your fourth record company. Do you think you might have found a more permanent home this time?

That’s an interesting comment. In our minds, it’s only our second one. The others were only for very short licensing arrangements in small territories. We have worked with Kolony Records for a long time and can’t thank them enough. And now we move on to our second Record company in Napalm Records.

What can you tell us about the new record, how does it sound and what was your approach?

On Vessels, we made a conscious decision to try adding some new ideas into our normal set of tones and riffs. This was really about keeping the music interesting. So it’s definitely still a melodic death metal album, but it also contains some more progressive elements. We took a few more risks, which was exciting – the last time we did this in such a way was when we released our second album, Stone’s Reach - in that case, it was quite a change from The Frail Tide. It is definitely good to keep things fresh as a band.

For the readers that might not know you yet, how would you describe Be'lakor?

I would say, imagine a cross between Dark Tranquillity, Agalloch, Deathspell Omega and Opeth. Melodic, dark, twisting songs which tell stories and, hopefully, continue to reveal new layers for the listener with each spin.

What do you write about? Do your albums follow themes?

We have always liked to tell stories with our songs. These tales are normally set in another time or place, and are often influenced by historical or mythological figures, events and cultures. We’re also heavily influenced by nature and science. Vessels represents the first time we’ve written one long story across the whole album. It was a really challenging and enjoyable process!

I really love the artwork on your previous release (Of Breath And Bone, 2012), a quite creepy looking painting of little red riding hood and the wolf! How did you land on this cover, and who made it?

We always liked Of Breath and Bone’s cover, because it had a subtle darkness and menace about it. So whilst it looked unusual for a metal album, for us, it was quite well suited because it hinted at something more. The painting itself is a really old one, made well over one hundred years ago by an artist called Gabriel Ferrier. It’s called Chaperon Rouge. We found it online and could see some real potential for it.

You have been together since 2004. What would you say has been the highlight of your musical journey so far?

For us the highlight has been getting the chance to travel to Europe as a band a few times and have some awesome shared experiences, playing in front of large festival crowds whilst also getting the chance to soak up other cultures. It has been something we’re really grateful for.

What are your wishes for the future with Be'lakor, what are your goals, where do you want to play?

Our goal has always has been simply to make music which we enjoy and that we’re proud of. This will continue to be our approach.

What do you think of the current metal scene? Are there bands out there you would say are under appreciated?

For me, the greatest ‘underrated’ discovery of recent times has been the music of A Forest of Stars. I really feel that their latest album, Beware the Sword You Cannot See, is a towering achievement.

Do you have any last words for our readers?

We would really like to thank you for the interview and also thank our fans for the support we receive, the messages, etc. It means a great deal to us!

Randy Gerritse